Lunan Bay 4

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Since I first visited Lunan Bay during the year 2000, I've become very familiar with the location, and it's become my very favourite place to collect agates and related gemstones. That is, tied with other locations in the Angus Coast detailed elsewhere on this site, that are not traditionally known. My partner Ingrid and I have spent a great deal of time here, in all weathers, and at all times of day and night, and concurrently have been successful in procuring some of the best material available. You can get lucky at Lunan anywhere, she's a fickle beast. Patches of shingle can crop up after a high tide especially, and searching these can provide fine isolated specimens. Lunan should be noted for its fine stalactitic and zeolitic agates, which occur regularly, occasionally the patterning being in conjunction with fortifications in rich colours, the golden yellow brown and bright orange-red being a particular combination regularly encountered. The frustration with Lunan, that I have learned to take in my stride, is that for the most part, the sand covers the shingle in the most productive places. On the few occasions I have seen the sand mostly removed, a few points of interest were noted: It can happen at any time of year, if the winds and tides are right. As well as shingle, areas of productive andesite are uncovered at particular spots. The majority of the best material occurs in the shore immediately adjacent to the dunes. If you are particularly fortunate, sometimes the sand covering the lower shore is uncovered, at least partially, revealing an area mostly composed of larger cobbles, being stones of around 8 to 10cm and up. Once in a while, one of those will be something worth acquiring.